Blendering for Unity (Eight)

Importing into Unity3D

;

Posted 05/12/2014 09:38:29 in Blendering for Unity

Updated 08/20/2017 19:12:52

Before taking our model into Unity, there are a couple of quick things that aren't totally necessary, but will help keep your models a bit more organized. In the Materials tab of the Properties frame on the right, rename your model's material to "characterMaterial". If you get into the habit of doing this, it'll save you from having to create a new material in Unity every time you add a model (if you don't do this, every model you import will use the same default "Material.mat" file in Unity).

Flip back to the Object tab in the Properties frame, and rename the "Cube" object to "characterMesh". This will also help keep things more organized in Unity.

Adding a material in Blender.
Adding a material in Blender.
Naming the object.
Naming the object.

As Deozaan pointed out to me in the comments, you have a choice of either flat-shading or smooth-shading your model (see the screenshot for the difference). By default, your model is flat shaded. If you want to smooth-shade your model, select all your faces (A, and just like when you were UV mapping, it doesn't actually matter whether you're in vertex, edge, or face selection mode). Either open up the Tools panel with T and click the Smooth button under the Shading/UVs tab, or hit Ctrl-F to bring up the Faces context menu and select Shade Smooth.

Flat shading vs. smooth shading.
Flat shading vs. smooth shading.

If you don't do this in Blender, you can still do it in Unity by setting Normals to Calculate in the model's import settings, but I noticed that the result isn't quite as good and results in more jagged shading. If you set the shading to Smooth in Blender, make sure you leave the Normals field on Import.

Flat shading vs. smooth shading.
Flat shading vs. smooth shading.
Flat shading vs. smooth shading in Unity.
Flat shading vs. smooth shading in Unity.

All right! Let's set up a quick project in Unity to give your character a home. Open up Unity, create a new directory for your project, check "Toon Shading" and "Skyboxes" in the Import Assets box, and create your project! Now hop out of Unity for a moment and open up two file browsers in your OS. Navigate one to your character model directory, and the other to your Unity project's Assets directory. Copy both "character.blend" and "characterColor.png" to your Assets directory (or, create a Models/Character subdirectory in Assets and put your character there). In my projects, I'll usually have a Models subdirectory, and another subdirectory for each particular model. Flip back to Unity, and it'll automatically recognize your model and import it.

Fresh Unity project.
Fresh Unity project.
Where to put your texture.
Where to put your texture.

Since we already optimized our .blend file, there isn't a whole lot of cleanup to do! However, there are two things regarding the animation clips that you'll want to consider doing. The first is to delete the "Default Take" clip. There is a way to avoid having Unity import it in the first place (exporting as .fbx from Blender and unchecking "Include Default Take"), but that's a topic that I won't be covering here (IMHO, the convenience of having Unity import the .blend instead of .fbx outweigh the negatives). Select your character in the Project browser, then flip to the Animations tab. Select "Default Take" and click the "-" button to remove it (this will stop your project from being polluted by Default Takes from every model you import).

The second thing you'll want to do is to enable "Loop Time" for the clips that you want to loop. Select the Idle clip, scroll down, and check Loop Time. This is more for demonstration in this project, since we'll just have the animations play into each other, but it can be frustrating if you're building a game and the animations play once and stop so I figured it was worth mentioning. Also, make sure you click Apply at the bottom (or confirm in the dialog that pops up if you don't click the button).

The import window.
The import window.
Setting up the animation.
Setting up the animation.

Start creating your scene by adding a new Terrain (GameObject->Create Other->Terrain). Relocate it to (-500, 0, -500) to center it on the scene's origin. Give it a texture by selecting it in the Heirarchy, switching to the Paint Texture tab, clicking Edit Textures->Add Texture, and selecting a base texture (I used the rock texture I made for Sail). Here's a .zip file with a few of the textures I made for Sail, along with the .blend I made for this series, to make things a little more convenient for you!

Adding a terrain.
Adding a terrain.
Setting transforms.
Setting transforms.
Adding a texture to the terrain.
Adding a texture to the terrain.

Let's add a simple water plane. Add a new plane (GameObject->Create Other->Plane), relocate it to (0, 2, 0) and scale it to (500, 1, 500) to match the terrain. Create a new material for the water (Assets->Create->Material). Select your plane in the Heirarchy, expand the Materials field in the Mesh Renderer component, and set the material (Element 0) to your water material. Click the Select button to choose your water texture, and set both the x and y tiling to 500 (since the plane is scaled up to 500 x 500).

Adding a water plane.
Adding a water plane.
Setting its transform.
Setting its transform.
Adding a material for the water.
Adding a material for the water.
Adjusting the texture tiling for the water.
Adjusting the texture tiling for the water.

Next, we'll take care of they lighting and camera. Create a Directional Light (GameObject->Create Other->Directional Light) to light your scene. Select your "Main Camera" in the Heirarchy, raise it up a bit (I set the y position to 5), and add a Skybox component (Add Component Button->Rendering->Skybox). Use the nub next to the "Custom Skybox" field to select one of your imported skyboxes (I chose Sunny2).

Adding a light.
Adding a light.
Adding a skybox.
Adding a skybox.
Giving the skybox a material.
Giving the skybox a material.

Now we'll add the character! Find your camera in the Scene View (double-clicking on "Main Camera" in the heirarchy can help), and make sure your Main Camera GameObject is selected to activate the Camera Preview window. Click and drag your character model into the scene view from the Project browser, and position it where you want on the x-z plane. Then, raise it up to leave room for the island, and rotate it to face the camera (it can help to use the Game view for this).

Adjusting the camera position.
Adjusting the camera position.
Final position.
Final position.

Let's create an island for the little guy to stand on! Select the Terrain in your Heirarchy, switch to the Raise Terrain tab in the Inspector, adjust the brush size and opacity, and click a few times around your character. Switch back to the Paint Texture tab, add a grass texture, and make the Opacity 100%. Click a few more times around your character to give it something soft and swirly to stand on! Odds are your character is either floating above or sinking into the terrain, so zoom in with the Scene view and position your character more accurately.

Preparing to paint the terrain.
Preparing to paint the terrain.
Painting the Terrain.
Painting the Terrain.
Final paint.
Final paint.

Time to add some animation! Create a new Animator Controller (Assets->Create->Animator Controller). Double click on it in the Project browser to open it up in the Animator window. Now you can drag your animation clips directly from your model in the Project view into the Animator! We'll keep it simple for this tutorial and just have the two clips transition back and forth into each other. Right click on each clip, hit "Make Transition", and click on the other. By default, this will transition into the second clip when the first is done. Select your character in the Hierarchy and click the nub by the Controller field in the Animator component to select your controller (make sure you switch to the Assets tab)!

Adding an Animator Controller.
Adding an Animator Controller.
Dragging in animation clips.
Dragging in animation clips.
Making transitions.
Making transitions.
Making transitions.
Making transitions.
Attaching the controller to the character.
Attaching the controller to the character.

The last thing to do is to add some cel shading to your character. Select your character's material in the project browser (It'll be in the Materials folder in the same directory that you put your model). Change the shader to Toon->Basic Outline. Set the cubemap to "toony lighting", and darken the main color a bit to stop it from blowing out.

Toon shading the character.
Toon shading the character.
Adding the cubemap to the shader.
Adding the cubemap to the shader.
Adjusting the color to avoid blowout.
Adjusting the color to avoid blowout.

You're done! Hit play, and watch the product of all the work you've put into these tutorials happily jump around :D

I hope these tutorials have been helpful! This is the last post in this series, but I think I'll add one or two more posts later on with a list of all the keyboard shortcuts that we used and a list of all the Unity-specific considerations to keep in mind when using Blender.

Happy Blending!

Grainygif!
Grainygif!

Comments

Josh

No comment but to say this is a godsend. Brilliant work here. I wish you had other tutorials! Your work here is one of the best on the Net. Keep it up my friend.

09/24/2017 13:01:34

Zak

Wow, thanks! I'll see what I can do-- been tied up working full-time and finishing a degree, but I'll be finished with said degree in a few months. I'm planning on getting back into regular posts about Homestead and probably some more tutorializing as well.

10/30/2017 03:28:40

Fuzzball

Thanks for this tutorial, I was wondering how difficult it would be to add some character animation to my game and this helps a lot.

05/12/2014 12:04:06

Deozaan

I am awful at art, hence the terrible texture, but here's my result of following your tutorial: <a href="http://i.imgur.com/iovo64t.png" rel="nofollow">Jump</a> I also did the UV unwrapping a bit differently than your tutorial explained. I made the sole of his foot a UV island, and marked a seam on the blob, dividing him in half vertically instead of horizontally. Then I folded the symmetrical seams over each other (using vertex snapping) to save room on the texture and take advantage of mirroring. Then I enlarged the UV space for the face to have lots of extra detail (which would be useful if I was any good at art...) <a href="http://i.imgur.com/LOhlKf0.png" rel="nofollow">Here is the texture with UV outlines</a> Oh, and I never did apply the Mirror modifier to the mesh. Yet the unwrapping and rigging worked fine still. Actually, I did have one problem with the rigging: The hips were not connected to the root/spine, so whenever I moved the root (during animation, for instance) the legs and feet would stay in their same position. But your instructions seemed to indicate that they should move with the root. Where did I go wrong with that? I also didn't like how the model was imported into Unity with "flat" shading so that I could see each face of the mesh. I told Unity to recalculate the normals on the model to give it a smoother appearance, but I suspect I wouldn't have needed to do that if I had remembered to change the Shading in Blender to Smooth instead of Flat. And one little nitpick about this final section of the tutorial: It feels a little bit as if you intended to do a few things but forgot to before the end of it. For instance, why did you have me import the Skyboxes into the Unity project but not include any instruction to set up a skybox in the scene? Thanks for the tutorial! It was very useful.

05/13/2014 01:58:05

Zak

Nice job! I think your guy looks great, large areas of flat colors work better with cel shading in my opinion anyway. Good to know about the Mirror modifier, and I'm not sure why your hip bones weren't moving, but I'll look into it. I actually went through and made the whole project and took screenshots before posting Part 1, but I didn't actually write the tutorials out until the days (or sometimes the day before) each individual part was posted, so I probably missed a step in my notes. The Unity Import part was written over a week after I did the project, and I decided to include extra textures/skyboxes later on. I do want to update this page in particular though, since I took the screenshots with Fraps and it only seems to see one part of Unity at a time. I'll try to get it done over my lunch break today. Also, I didn't know that you could make it look smoother by having Unity recalculate the normals! Thank you so much for that! I'll look into whether it makes a difference to change the shading in Blender too. Thanks a million for the feedback! Glad these articles helped :)

05/13/2014 06:53:21

BlenderN00b

Hey, I'm looking at this tutorial two years later and I'm so happy that it exists. I'm nearly done with my import, but I saw this question so I don't know if it was ever answered for you. There's a small checklist on the right side where you make sure that the bones are connected or not. The hip should not have "Connected" checked, but there should be a dialog box that says "Parent". When you select the hip, it should be empty. Click it, select "Root" and you'll be good!

08/14/2016 03:54:52

Zak

I'm glad the tutorial helped you out! Thanks for the tip, that would definitely explain the legs not moving with the hip. If you don't mind me asking, did you run into any sticking points while you went through the posts? I haven't had the time to go through and check that the process still works in the newer versions of Blender and Unity, but I'd still like to fix any major problems if there are any :)

08/14/2016 13:35:34

Galaxy613

Thank you sooo much for this tutorial! This was the best crash-course tutorial and now I am not scared of Blender any more :D https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/120376/wave.png

05/15/2014 14:50:25

Zak

Awesome character! No problem, I'm glad you got something out of it! :)

05/15/2014 19:09:21

Josh

Great job! Written tutorials are in such short supply, so thank you so much for putting in the time to write this one. I spent a few months learning Blender, then a few learning Unity, then took a break... I really needed a refresher and this was the perfect crash course to get me back on track. It also introduced me to importing from blender and applying animations to a game object. That portion felt rushed, but that's probably because that part was all new to me. Suggestion for your next tutorial, if you are so inclined (and I hope you are, because this one was great): add a segment on scripting. A simple jump button is enough, it would let us see our idle animation and open eyes to what Unity can do. Thanks again mate.

05/22/2014 22:56:04

Zak

Thanks for the feedback! I'm glad this helped, and yeah it wouldn't be hard for me to add a little jump script to the tutorial. Just doing that would give a pretty decent base for how the animator controller works too! I originally aimed to write this for people already experienced in Unity, but I think the whole animation/mecanim system has enough of a learning curve that it'd definitely be worthwhile to write a tutorial on it.

05/23/2014 13:04:14

Marco

Hey, I just finished your tutorial and it probably made my week. Thanks a million for what you did, I really appreciate it.

06/12/2014 20:36:16

Zak

Glad I could help :)

06/13/2014 14:08:42

Tim S.

I'm stuck at the beginning of this part where we start renaming properties for easy of importing. I have imported the png I used to wrap my mesh and I can see it in 'textured' view mode easily enough, but when I go to name the material as characterMaterial, I see that it's no where in sight! Any suggestions? http://new.tinygrab.com/fd78ab551d6655fa27c5517db64f312195e16bc222.png

06/14/2014 17:28:11

Zak

Hey Tim, glad you enjoyed the tutorials! It looks like you've already named it correctly to me- there shouldn't be any problems when you import (and please let me know if there are!). I've circled two places in your screenshot: http://www.zakjr.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/tim-help.jpg You can either double-click on the label (1 in the screenshot, and the way I did it in the tutorial), or you can single click on the lower label (2 in the screenshot) to rename it. Hope that helps!

06/15/2014 01:15:29

Tim S.

Cool, that's exactly where I had made sure to rename it at, the 2 spot is just cut off because of how small my side bar is. Thank you! I didn't just import it as it was, I actually followed some direction on ( http://wiki.blender.org/index.php/Doc:2.6/Manual/Textures/Mapping/UV/Applying_Image ) in order to get my UV map to appear in the material's pane. I didn't try importing it without doing that, so I'm not sure what the result would have been. I created a material with the UV map image I drew so that it would be on the Preview's sample sphere like how it showed on your screen shots. When I DID import it, it showed up in Unity, so it worked, whether I needed to create that texture a second time after just loading it from the UV wrapping second or not, I'm not sure. After some research, what I found out was that looking at the model in the textured view port would show my skin just fine, but if I had added lights and a camera and stuff and Rendered it in Blender, it would just be a shaded grey mesh, because I had not created the specific material for it. If that's fine enough for importing to Unity, then I performed an extra step, but I decided to create that material object with my skin image, and then import to Unity, and it did happen to work. Maybe it's more clean that way? I'm not sure, but that's what I found! Once again, great tutorials, and I would definitely advocate going a bit further, like scripting a jump! I really enjoyed the glimpse into the Animator Controller, I didn't even know it was a thing! All the best, Tim S.

06/15/2014 06:22:05

Tim S.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/hoz6l2dsfwz4iao/Screenshot%202014-06-15%2010.25.11.png https://www.dropbox.com/s/drg63sqr0jomrd0/Screenshot%202014-06-15%2010.25.33.png https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/35098555/jumpyguy.zip

06/15/2014 06:26:24

Jed S.

Very nice Tim!

12/07/2014 12:38:31

Zak

Thanks for the details! I played around a bit and found that it imports just as well either way.. To me, the best reason for setting up the material in Blender would be to preview the model with lighting in Blender (which would be better if you prefer working entirely in Blender). That way, you can make edits to the texture and see the results in Blender. The alternative is to import into Unity, and then make your changes to the copy of your texture in the project (which is what I like to do, just because that way you're dealing with the exact lighting in your game). Definitely a matter of personal preference though :) I think I will write an addition, going into some basic scripting and a bit more of the Animator Controller. I'm happy these tutorials helped you and that you took the time to contribute! I love your character btw, especially the sassy pose :D

06/15/2014 19:37:09

hapliniste

Cool tutorial, here's what I have done with it. I made thomething a bit more complicated but I like what it looks like :) Walk (with mecanim): http://www.hapshack.com/images/txIZ.gif The jumping animation isn't integrated in unity for now (but it looks cool too :D ) Thank you for the tutorial, it's clear and easy to follow!

07/16/2014 08:36:34

Zak

Sweet! Glad you liked the tutorial :)

07/16/2014 20:51:15

Nahuel Bergamo

This is an awesome tutorial Zak!, I simplified the animation a bit because it was giving me headaches, I settled for a no flappy arms version. Here's a video of the little guy in action: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gd5U0GvtbjQ Cheers!

07/27/2014 22:49:59

Zak

Thanks! Your Kirby looks great :D

07/30/2014 19:28:11

Fito

Thank you, thank you, thank you! Clear and easy to follow tutorial. I really appreciate that you took the time to write all this, take and organize the screenshots, etc. Video tutorials are good but many times difficult, boring or pointless to follow. This, on the other hand, was amazingly easygoing and well explained. I'll send this to fellow students!

09/08/2014 03:35:20

Zak

Thanks! I also find video tutorials to be a bit of a hassle sometimes, which is why I wrote this out. I'm glad you found it useful :)

09/18/2014 12:31:38

kaz syren old

Hi, Thanks a lot for the tutorial! Sorry, it's quite long, but here's my story. --- STORY START --- I've been learning Blender for a while and want to make a game. I learnt that you can make game using Blender and Unity that everyone is talking about. I read somewhere that you can import models from Blender to Unity, so I try to find how to do it and find almost nothing or too complicated. While you say that the tutorial is intended for advanced Unity user, I can finish this tutorial easily. From all the tutorials I've tried, you're the best one, even the official Blender tutorial is not as clear as yours. I only have some difficulty with 'check "Toon Shading" and "Skyboxes" in the Import Assets box'. In my Unity(4.5.1) there's only option to choose the project's location, so I stuck in some parts of the tutorial, though I can solve it by asking for uncle Google's help :) Now I'm determined to make the game using Unity instead of Blender, Unity's boss can say thanks to you! --- STORY END --- I have a question, can you do it using fbx too? All the other tutorials I found require me to export the blend to fbx first. The last thing, I notice that the character has some 'black' artifact around the face in Unity. I want to upload using gif format, but it's too blurry for you to notice. If you have time, please watch the videos :) I'll try to tinker Unity's setting around a bit to fix it. But just in case you know about the problem, please kindly tell me :) Unity: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/101351242/unity.mp4 Blender: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/101351242/blender.avi Again, thanks!

10/15/2014 01:29:36

Zak

Hi! Thank you for the kind words, and yes, you can certainly export/import as .fbx instead of using the .blend file (I'll add an addendum to the tutorial explaining how to set up the exporter properly in Blender). I use the direct .blend method mostly because it's a simpler process (especially if you're iterating, i.e. making small changes in Blender after the model is finished), but there are definitely benefits to the .fbx method (for example, you can remove the "Default Take" animation, and if you have lights and a camera you can prevent them from being exported). As far as the black artifacts around the face, that's due to the low-poly nature of the character (the edges around the face are sharp enough that the Toon shader thinks they need to have a line drawn). The best way to fix this is to add another Subdivision Surface modifier to smooth the model (you can do this either at the beginning of the process or after you finish the model, it doesn't affect the UV coordinates and shouldn't affect the bone weights, although if it does you can redo the "Parent With Automatic Weights" step). Hope this helps!

10/27/2014 12:58:49

kaz syren old

Hi, I haven't tried your suggestion but the artifact does not appear in my more complex model. By following the beginner tutorial I've successfully made this http://goo.gl/LKhikk Again, thank you for introducing me to Unity :)

11/06/2014 21:34:06

Zak

I like it! Great job, and I'm glad I could help!

11/09/2014 10:45:08

kaz syren old

Hi, at last the game has been finished. It took more time than I thought.. I guess making game is not for me :) If you're interested to see: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=shinpachinaide.game.irukajump

02/01/2015 19:52:51

Zak

Congrats! I just played it, it's a cute little game :)

02/03/2015 11:59:51

Andrew

Thanks a lot! this was a lot of fun and it taught me a lot!! Mine didn't turn out very well, but here's what I had (ignore the bit at the beginning): http://i.imgur.com/mk3vYM4.jpg This was very useful, thanks!

12/05/2014 23:35:09

EnragedTadpole

Just wanted to say thanks heaps for the tutorial! I found it incredibly useful and made my understanding of the Unity workflow a lot better! :)

01/01/2015 02:13:33

Ike

Thanks for doing this series! It will be awesome being able to make my own models for my games instead of praying I can find someone to do it for me, lol. I'm not scared of 3d anymore!

01/09/2015 15:48:25

Zak

That's exactly why I made it, I was in the same boat :)

01/14/2015 20:12:02

Ike

Just finished the tutorial, thanks so much! Here's my fat little dude! http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2ewx5b_my-first-3d-model_tech

01/17/2015 01:27:55

Zak

Haha I love his face! Nice work, and I'm glad you liked the tutorial :)

01/17/2015 07:10:08

Mike

Hi, I have followed all the steps numerous times and on a different object. I have an odd problem, after i apply the texture i can see it in blender on the object working fine. When i go to change the material name there is none there??? I tried the drop down list you suggested to the other guy earlier but mine is blank? When I export to unity no texture shows up? Thx Mike

02/16/2015 02:30:07

Zak

Sorry for the late reply! To be honest, as long as you can see the texture on the model in Blender you should be fine (the purpose is to allow for quick tweaking of the texture to see how it appears in 3D). Unity won't automatically import textures from .blend files so just copy your .png into the Assets folder, and then manually set up the material (in the last step in this post when you're setting up cel shading, you can also click on the "Base (RGB)" field and select your texture). Hope this helps!

03/23/2015 14:14:51

Matias

I'm just going to leave this here... http://i.imgur.com/P6VjghI.gif And some thanks, too. Amazing tutorial, keep it up :)

02/23/2015 18:38:35

Victor

Thanks, this entire series was extremely helpful to me. I appreciate all the time and effort you put into making this available.

07/19/2015 17:04:03

SImon

You da real MVP!

08/04/2015 10:01:09

MonkeyKid

This was really helpful, thanks...

08/14/2015 08:20:47

Ben

Thank you for this tutorial! Was beating my head up against a wall, but this helped immensely!

10/02/2015 13:12:14

Ches

Thanks for the tutorial! I went a little off the rails and gave my guy a fluttering strut: https://imgur.com/E405CbU

10/31/2015 12:08:31

Zak

This made me laugh! I love the slow turn with that expression!

10/31/2015 18:00:17

Martin Semerad

Hi, thank you soooo much for this tutorial! I have to admit that I tried to start with Blender many times but it was very confusing so I gave up. This time I finally made it. Thank you again, I had a lot of fun. Cheers from Prague.

11/27/2015 10:11:29

Zak

No problem, I'm glad you were finally able to get the hang of it! Prague is a beautiful city, by the way :)

11/30/2015 10:04:56

Patrik

Hi, thanks for the tutorial! It helped me a lot! But now I'm stuck, because my material isn't textured. Why is that? How can I fix this problem? http://imgur.com/izt6EW1

12/26/2015 08:34:01

Zak

Hi Patrik, glad it was mostly helpful! For importing into Unity, it shouldn't matter. Your texture is applied to the faces and not the material, which is what should happen if you follow the tutorial instructions (weird and confusing, I know :P), but Unity should understand as long as the "characterColor.png" file is in your Assets folder. If it doesn't work automatically, you can manually set the "Base(RGB)" field in the model's Unity material to your texture. Let me know if that helps! I think it's time for me to update the texture making part of the tutorial as well.

12/28/2015 10:50:14

Patrik

Thanks, I found the problem. First I tried to import the .blend file and the CharacterColor file to unity by just dragging and dropping. It doesn't work that way, because unity will create a default CharacterColor material, which is untextured, and use that instead of the leater imported CharacterColor. So this thing only works if you're using the file manager. But now my character is all textured and happy in Unity! :D

12/30/2015 05:25:31

Joshua Grant

This was awesome! My guy is here: https://twitter.com/joshuadotworks/status/722690544472875008

04/20/2016 02:38:51

Gustavo Gonzalez

Awesome tutorial! There's this low poly ninja tutorial that I kept trying to use to start learning Blender and I could never get through it. I probably tried that one four or five different times throughout the year, but this tutorial was very easy to follow and finally did the trick. Thank you! Here's what I ended up with: https://www.dropbox.com/s/z7wdt1jgjsyh9rh/FarastToon.gif?dl=0

08/27/2016 04:02:19

Zak

Hey, it's great to hear that you made it all the way through! I like your character, it reminds me of the Chao from the Gamecube-era Sonic games :)

08/27/2016 17:07:56

Paul

I think they animator in the newest version of Unity might be different now. There are now 2 boxes when you create a new animator controller. One says 'Any State" and the other says 'Entry' As soon as I drag an animation into the controller it creates an arrow connecting the Entry to one of the animation boxes. Nothing animates when I hit "play". The animations are there when I preview them in the Inspector though.

11/27/2016 13:30:29

Paul

Nevermind I'm an idiot. I missed the part where you add the controller to the character: ". Select your character in the Hierarchy and click the nub by the Controller field in the Animator component to select your controller"

11/27/2016 13:48:08

Zak

Hey Paul, sorry for the late reply and outdated content! Glad you figured it out :)

01/05/2017 18:35:07
Today